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Plucky Grandmother Fights Amazon, Apple, and BookBaby over KDP Promotion

9 Oct

Are you relating to this, indie authors and publishers? The total opacity of the system and the impossibility of getting a real person to help you. The sense of being lost in a hostile, incomprehensible world. It’s all true. We deal with this all the time, on EVERY friggin’ thing about getting our books in print and posted somewhere where at least our MOTHERS can read them. It’s a nightmare. This is what happened next:

eBook Pricing and eBook Sales––PROFIT MAXIMIZATION is the Goal

30 Sep

Do I mind giving my work away? Not all all. A book given away yields the same profit as one not sold. I’d rather get new readers than have my work sit in Amazon’s computers hoping that someone will see it’s value. (And mine . . . DO NOT confuse your personal value with what your books sell for.)

I look at pricing in terms of profit maximization, not “how much my books are worth” or “how much I’m worth.” Our books worth a lot and so are we. We deserve to make a great deal on them. But what’s the worth of a book that doesn’t sell? Nothing.

Visionary Fiction ––What Is It & What Makes It Visionary?

2 Aug

To me, visionary fiction rests on a core moral principle. St. Thomas Aquinas’ famous maxim, “Do good and avoid evil,” spells it out about as clearly as it gets. Visionary fiction contains a moral core and a belief in the ability of individuals and society to evolve in a positive fashion, overcoming evil and generally setting the world right.

Does this mean that visionary fiction is by nature a Polly-Anna-ish or The Secret-ish exercise in “Keep up a cheery front and everything will be groovy in the sweet by and by, if not sooner”?

Some visionary fiction fits that mold and has been very well received by readers (if not critics). This includes some of the best-known examples of the genre and I think it probably fits the experience and expectations of many readers of visionary fiction.

But! What if you aren’t the typical reader? What if you want a message with a wallop? A message with teeth, that bites?

I’m like that. I hate anything easy, simpering, obvious, trite, and watered-down. My writing reflects my preferences. It contains violence, sexual situations, strong language, and doesn’t give away it’s ending until it ends. Happy endings are not guaranteed. I’d give my books an R rating if they were movies. (Though they’re way, way less violent than stuff I’ve seen on TV and in the movies. Like the TV series “24” and the smash hit book and move, The Hunger Games.